Utterson visits Lanyon. Mr. Utterson is characterized as a Victorian gentlemen, but he is also one who does not fully represent the Victorian Era, and has some stark contrasts to the epitome of those Victorian Gentlemen. Utterson also provides a contrast as a the voice of reason compared to the supernatural and fantastical elements provided by Jekyll and his experiments. Utterson goes to warn Jekyll. Stevenson shows Utterson's personality to be. In another turn of meaning, Utterson is used as a representation of the secretive and masquerading Victorian gentleman, who hides his flaws beneath an impeccable and impenetrable facade. Finally, Utterson asks the man's name and Enfield reveals it was a Mr. Edward Hyde. The job of Utterson is respectable. Mr Utterson, a respectable man, is described to be 'backward in sentiment' meaning he finds it hard to show emotion. He is very dull and proper but is yet described as being fairly “loveable”. Almost every Gothic novel takes place within a strange, secret location, and London from this novel has the exact criteria well. Utterson is a lawyer and therefore a respectable, wealthy man in Victorian London. Utterson is a lawyer and therefore a respectable, wealthy man in Victorian London. Sign in, choose your GCSE subjects and see content that's tailored for you. He prefers to remain looking for a explanation to preserve reason rather than to even consider darker forces at play. Stevenson shows Utterson's personality to be rational, calm and curious. Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1886) is a late-Victorian variation on ideas first raised in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818). How are they different? However, he is most probably hiding his emotions to do what is right within society. What is Mr Utterson’s relationship to Mr Enfield? He consistently seeks to preserve order and decorum, does not gossip, and guards his friends’ reputations as though they were his own. In another turn of meaning, Utterson is used as a representation of the secretive and masquerading Victorian gentleman, who hides his flaws beneath an impeccable and impenetrable facade. "I can't pretend that I shall ever like him," said the lawyer. His lovability may stem from the only interesting quality that Stevenson gives him—namely, his willingness to remain friends with someone whose reputation has suffered. . Mr Utterson, a respectable man, is described to be 'backward in sentiment' meaning he finds it hard to show emotion. Although Utterson witnesses a string of shocking events, Utterson himself is a largely unexciting character and is clearly not a man of strong passions or sensibilities. Mr Utterson is a very Victorian gentleman, naturally unexciting with no strong passions or sensibilities. At the beginning of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, … Stevenson characterizes him because having “a rugged countenance that was never lit by a laugh. Mr Utterson is a very Victorian gentleman, naturally unexciting with no strong passions or sensibilities. Re-read lines 1-22. Utterson is persistent in his quest to uncover the true reality of Mr Hyde and his relationship with Dr Jekyll. It is through these personality traits that Utterson uncovers the mystery of Dr Jekyll's will. Through the third person narrative structure the reader is positioned with Mr Utterson for most of the story, unravelling the clues to the mysterious connection between Jekyll and Hyde alongside the lawyer. Chapter 2 Search for Mr Hyde: Utterson is worried. This implies they made sure their walks were priority. Your time is important. This demonstrates Utterson's persistence in wanting to find Mr Hyde. This loyalty leads him to plumb the mystery that surrounds Jekyll. He was serious, boring, and very determined to find out exactly what was going on with Dr. Jekyll. The gentlemen ensure that they do not have a clash of opinions with others but strive to maintain a respectable and likeable reputation with those who know him and his family so will always stay away from any actions that will jolt in the perceptions of those who he knows. Lanyon hasn’t heard of Hyde and not seen Jekyll for 10 years. Mr. Utterson is a character that, to me, signified the typical Victorian professional man. It was people like Utterson that found it unimaginable that someone like Dr. Jekyll would want to be someone completely other than himself. Utterson: The Ideal Victorian Man In Mr. Hyde. "a large, well-made, smoothed faced man of fifty" Physical description of Jekyll. 3. He is a wealthy man and lives in a house with his butler, Poole. Dr Jekyll is a well-respected and intelligent scientist. The final chapters are told from the perspective of his friend, Dr Lanyon and then Dr Jekyll himself. He prefers to sweep gossip and scandal under the rug rather than taking a stand on the matter, especially when they stem from his own friends such as in the case of Jekyll. Analysis: He is in the respectable middle class. Mr. Utterson’s importance to the story is characterized by his character, the way others portray him through indirect characterization, and direct characterization by the author. How are the two men alike? Contrasting to that of Hyde. Utterson's persistence leads him to discover the truth about Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde's relationship. In conclusion Mr Utterson is presented as the perfect Victorian gentleman who does not gossip, constantly seeks to preserve order and decorum, and guards his friends’ reputations as though they were his own. The text notes that Utterson has a face that is ‘never lighted by a smile’ and only speaks when necessary. He reads "dry divinity," goes to bed no later than midnight, has perfect manners, and is systematic, rational, and conscientious. (pg 12) The inheritance of property by one person, especially a well respected man during that time would go either to family, or a friend that would be very well respected as well. Jekyll's response to Utterson's good deed shows that Jekyll is grateful for what Utterson has done and for his friendship. Most of the novel is seen from Mr Utterson's perspective. This shows that Utterson speaks his mind - to the point where his friendship with Jekyll could be compromised. Home Economics: Food and Nutrition (CCEA). The Victorian society gentleman find indulging in his own pleasures to be a great effort and slightly amiss. To give context to the discussion of unacceptable pleasures, the general idea of respectable man's traits should be was having self-control and discipline. Think of Mr. Utterson as the Victorian ideal (minus his penchant for being friends with sketchy characters): Mr Gabriel Utterson in Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, . Mr. Utterson is the first character the narrator introduces in the story. Indeed, Stevenson intends for him to come across in this way: from the first page of the novel, the text notes that Utterson has a face that is “never lighted by a smile,” that he speaks very little, and that he seems “lean, long, dusty, [and] dreary.” Yet, somehow, he is also “lovable,” and dull and proper though he may be, he has many friends. In another turn of meaning, Utterson is used as a representation of the secretive and masquerading Victorian gentleman, who hides his flaws beneath an impeccable and impenetrable facade. All these are examples of unacceptable behaviour in the Victorian times. As they can almost surely relate to … Utterson also provides a contrast as a the voice of reason compared to the supernatural and fantastical elements provided by Jekyll and his experiments. Stevenson’s monster, however, is not artificially created from stitched-together body parts, but rather emerges fully formed from the dark side of the human personality. In this way, Utterson is the epitome of the Victorian man and Victorian society as a whole. Typical manners expected of a Victorian gentleman Victorian gentleman’s costume Respect. … Stevenson uses the pun "Mr Seek" to show Utterson's curious nature, Utterson cares about his friend, Dr Jekyll. He really admires him and values him as a friend - he wants to see Jekyll happy. In conclusion, Utterson’s character, portrayed as a typical Victorian man, as I have already mentioned, is able to communicate with the Victorian readers. However, he is most probably hiding his emotions to do what is right within society. What sort of person is Mr Utterson? In Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886), Robert Louis Stevenson uses Mr. Hyde to show that Victorian people and society are imperfect and have dualities that Victorian values deny, ultimately leading to the destruction of the repressed person or society. When Mr Utterson comes across Jekyll’s will and reviews it, Jekyll knows he disapproves of it and says “I never saw a man so distressed as you were by my will”. In another turn of meaning, Utterson is used as a representation of the secretive and masquerading Victorian gentleman, who hides his flaws beneath an impeccable and impenetrable facade. 1016 Words 5 Pages. Views 577 Although Utterson witnesses a series of shocking events, the character is presented as an unenthusiastic and pessimistic Victorian man, and is evident from the very first page of the novel. Typical Victorian society Humanity is complex - you cannot pigeonhole Mr Utterson the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance, that was never lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in discourse; backward in sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary and yet somehow loveable. He reads his friend Dr Jekyll’s will, which says if he disappears, everything is left to Mr Hyde. Let us write you an essay from scratch The fact that Utterson, a 'lawyer', is out at night links to how he isn't acting like the typical Victorian gentleman of the … 1. His refusal to acknowledge the darker side of human nature and his commitment to logical reason was Stevenson's representation of his society's commitment to propriety. Within turn of which means, Utterson can be used as a rendering of the secretive and masquerading Victorian gentleman, who conceals his defects beneath a great and impassable facade. Utterson starts watching the door and is shocked to see evil Hyde unlocking it. The text notes that Utterson has a face that is ‘never lighted by a smile’ and only speaks when necessary. Enfield confirms this and the two men vow to never speak of the incident again. Utterson indulges misbehavior without judgment and doesn’t feel compelled to impose his values on others. outspoken when it comes to his dislike for Mr Hyde. The reason behind this is to create a bond with the reader to show how the typical Victorian man would react to a particular situation and the obstacles he would face. Utterson is devoted to his job; going to the theatre is a waste of time, only work is important for a Victorian man. During the Victorian era, the importance of being highly regarded by one’s "If he be Mr Hyde," he had thought, "I shall be Mr Seek.". Yet Utterson is also used as a representation of the typical Victorian gentleman, who reminds the reader that Jekyll’s duality is present within all of society and within every person. Most of the novel is seen from Mr Utterson's perspective. Utterson is a lawyer and therefore a respectable, wealthy man in Victorian London. Re-read the description of the door (lines 23-36). Mr Enfield, a close friend of Mr Utterson, made sure 'they resisted the calls of business'. Although Utterson witnesses a series of shocking events, the character is presented as an unenthusiastic and pessimistic Victorian man, and is evident from the very first page of the novel. Our tips from experts and exam survivors will help you through. Read about our approach to external linking. At the beginning of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Stevenson uses … Under a great "weight of consideration," Utterson asks if the man used a key to get into the door. This confuses him, as Jekyll's wish is to leave all of his belongings and wealth to the mysterious criminal Mr Hyde. "This is very good of you, this is downright good of you, and I cannot find words to thank you in.". Utterson is a respectable lawyer; in turn he becomes the narrator of the story. You are welcome to use this sample for your research! 2. Rather, his behavior is typical of the Victorian era dictum: Keep out of others’ affairs. Mr Utterson is also shown as a typical gentleman in the Victorian era through his manners and his job, he is a lawyer and therefore that is considered a very highly regarded job back in this era and even now and it also shows his class above others also he is always ‘proper’ in his words and actions which all relate to the fact that he is typical ‘Victorian’ gentleman of the time in chapter 1 Mr. Utterson represents the conventional Victorian guy. This implies they made sure their walks were priority. This loyalty leads him to plumb the mystery that surrounds Jekyll. The personification of 'mournful reinvasion' emphasises the foreshadowing because the adjective 'mournful' is normally associated with death and grief. Mr Enfield, a close friend of Mr Utterson, made sure 'they resisted the calls of business'. Misconceptions for Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Miscellaneous Information (Derived from Other Websites. Throughout Enfield's narrative, he does not name he mysterious man. Utterson represents the perfect Victorian gentleman. Note: The essay example you see on this page is a free essay, available to anyone. How does Stevenson use language to present him as a typical Victorian gentleman? He is very dull and proper but is yet described as being fairly “loveable” He prefers to sweep gossip and scandal under the rug rather than taking a stand on the matter, especially when they stem from his own friends such as in the case of Jekyll. Remember: This is just a sample from a fellow student.