... And that's it for this master class for more help with using past forms when you're not talking about the past, go to our website. NeilHere's another example. b) I only waited a few minutes when the bus had arrived. Since I began acting, I (perform) in two plays, a television commercial and a TV drama. As with the present perfect continuous, we are more interested in the process. It’s quite tricky! We need the past perfect continuous for the earlier action or situation. Well done if you got them all right. Both tensesBoth the past continuous and past perfect continous take place in the past, both are useful narrative tenses and both are continuous tenses, which means they are unlikely to use state verbs. We joint these two tenses using time words 'when' and 'while'. The past perfect continuous is formed using 'had' + 'been' + verb-ing. Past continuous and hypotheses. When I (arrive) home last night, I discovered that 2. The Past Perfect Continuous tense is used to express that an action started in the past and continued in the past until something else happened in the past. Functions of the past perfect continuous The past perfect continuous corresponds to the present perfect continuous, but with reference to a time earlier than 'before now'. Read on for detailed descriptions, examples, and present perfect continuous exercises. 1. It tests what you learned on the Past Perfect Continuous page. Peek, peak and pique: what's the difference? 3. In this session you're going to read about a difficult cycle ride for Maria and an unfortunate bathroom incident. My dad _____ smoking in the garage. Hey, come here you. CatherineSo, we use the past perfect continuous to talk about something that was happening before another event or situation in the past. BBC Learning English dot com goodbye. CatherineYes. NeilWe often use it to give background information about a situation or event that was happening up to another event in the past…. We'll give you lots of examples. Joe had been living in London for two years when they met. Which 3 things do the past continuous and past perfect continuous tenses have in common? NeilSo we had been trying, in the past perfect continuous, was the earlier action. CatherineThe earlier action was he’d been hoping. b) Sam finally bought the car that he'd been saving up for. What's the difference between 'fill up', 'fill out' and 'fill in'? The past perfect is used in the same way as the present perfect, but it refers to a time in the past, not the present. Number one: a) I'd only been waiting a few minutes when the bus arrived. Events in the past perfect always take place before the past simple or past continuous. NeilSometimes we can use either the past perfect simple or the past perfect continuous, particularly for activities that continue for a long time, like work, run or sleep. For a better experience please enable Javascript in your browser, I'll have been studying English for thirty weeks, Tim's Pronunciation Workshop (intermediate). 2. The Past Perfect Continuous tense is also know as the Past Perfect Progressive. How do we talk about mistakes in the past? Session 2. Test your knowledge in this crazy quiz! Both take place in the past, both are useful narrative tenses and both are continuous tenses, which means they are unlikely to use state verbs. CatherineExactly. 1. GapFillTyping_MTYzMzI= Level: intermediate. FinnPatrick felt refreshed because he had been sleeping all day. What's the difference between the past continuous tense and the past perfect continuous tense? When the police arrived, the thief had escaped. FinnHe missed the train, which he'd been hoping to catch. That's what Ann wants to know. Being an avid television viewer in the age of #PeakTV means that for every show you actually do tune in … FinnWe had been trying to open the door for five minutes when I finally found the key. Finn Patrick felt refreshed because he had slept all afternoon. We can also use the past continuous to refer to the present or future in hypotheses (when we imagine something). In Session 3 we have a special English at Work programme for you. "What's the difference between the past continuous tense and the past perfect continuous tense? Learn some useful business English phrases with Anna and her colleagues at Tip Top Trading. You can do this grammar quiz online or print it on paper. the past perfect definition: 1. the grammatical form used for an action that had already finished when another action happened…. NeilNow, in this case Joe had been living tells us what Joe was doing up to the time he met Alice. As with the present perfect continuous, we are more interested in the process. The present perfect continuous is formed with have/has been and the -ing form of the verb. Neil   Hello and welcome to 6 Minute Grammar with me, Neil. Verb Tense Exercise 14 Present Perfect, Past Perfect, Present Perfect Continuous, and Past Perfect Continuous f t p Using the words in parentheses, complete the text below with the appropriate tenses, then click the "Check" button to check your answers. I lived in Miami, Florida. had not been See you there! The past continuous or past perfect continuous tense? Catherine It’s a). CatherineYes, and that is the past perfect continuous in relative clauses and after time conjunctions. And the event that happened later in time: Jack ran the marathon, was in the past simple and came first in the sentence. If you have a question for Learners' Questions, email us on learning.english@bbc.co.uk. The printer _____ working well. This when two actions happen together: a longer (usually past continuous) action, and a shorter action (usually in the past simple). NeilSo, we had after plus I had been swimming. Present perfect continuous. The past perfect continuous can help. Simple: HAD + past participle An action occurred before another action in the past. Will Well done! Catherine Continuous: HAD BEEN + V-ing An action started in the past and continued up until another time in the past So, here's another sentence. I arrived at 11am. 1 … Past perfect for the earlier of two past actions. 'Fast', 'quick' and 'quickly': what's the difference? CatherineFor negative sentences, it's subject plus hadn't been and the present participle. When I arrived, Ram had been waiting for two hours. has had had been a) has b) had c) had been. They had been painting the bedroom. Here’s Finn. In this activity we're looking at the present perfect continuous tense. Had you been drinking when you fell off your bike? The burglars’ actions all happen before this point in the past) How could we tell the same story using only the simple past? CatherineThat's right. FinnI'd already cooked supper when Jan got home. 6 Minute Grammar ©British Broadcasting Corporation 2015 bbclearningenglish.com Page 4 of 5 Neil Sometimes we can use either the past perfect simple or the past perfect continuous, particularly for activities that continue for a long time, like work, run or sleep. And another common structure to use with past perfect continuous is a time conjunction, like this: FinnAfter I had been swimming for an hour, I was so cold I had to stop. NeilNow, we form the past perfect continuous with subject plus had been and the present participle of the main verb. Past continuousThe past continuous is formed using 'was' or 'were' + verb-ing. Here we teach you two commonly confused grammar points - the past simple and the past continuous! CatherineIf the earlier action is incomplete, use the past perfect continuous, to focus on the process or length of time that the action continued, rather than the end result. Jane (prepare) a beautiful candlelight dinner. Today, we're talking about the past perfect continuous tense…. He had been training for it since 2010. ( had lived, had sung …). Read about our approach to external linking. CatherineThat's quite common with the past perfect continuous. Join us again for more 6 Minute Grammar. If you had been planning to do anything else why not put it off it and learn about the past perfect continuous instead? The 'interrupted past'The past continuous tense is often used in combination with the past simple tense. Like the past perfect simple, it talks about a past action that was in progress before another past action. NeilSo, the past perfect continuous phrase he had been training came in the second part of the sentence, but it happened earlier in time. Welcome to the Grammar Gameshow! past: present: future: NeilAnd, now it's time for our quiz. We hadn't been waiting long when the taxi arrived. The past perfect describes actions that happened before the point in the past that we are currently speaking about. CatherineAnd we're talking about the past perfect continuous. The shorter past simple action often interrupts the longer past continuous one. 'Out-' or 'over-': which prefix should we use? You'll find a summary and more episodes on our website: https://bbc.in/2E1vWPY # grammar # … For example: Ram started waiting at 9am. (The starting point for the story is when the teacher arrives home from work. Learn how to use it in 6 Minute Grammar. NeilAnd don't forget those short forms: I had becomes I'd; We had is we'd; had not is hadn't and so on. Number 2: a) After they'd been walking for three hours, they realised they were lost. Listen to this: FinnJack ran the marathon in less than three hours. The Past Perfect Continuous tense is like the Past Perfect tense, but it expresses longer actions in the past before another action in the past. We can use the past perfect to show the order of two past events. You'd been listening to the programme for six minutes, when you realised this session was over! There's lots more about this on our website at bbclearningenglish.com. and that's what we're doing on this learners questions. CatherineAnd it's a) again. FinnI hadn't been waiting very long when the bus arrived. October 13. You can download 6 Minute Grammar from our Unit 14 Downloads page. How well do you know English grammar? The past perfect continuous tense - 6 Minute Grammar - YouTube In fact, you could say it's perfect for stories! The past perfect continuous is made from had been and the -ing form of a verb: I had been working there for a year. Grammar topics include present tenses, the present perfect continuous, the past perfect, zero conditionals, reported speech, relative clauses, passive voice, intensifiers and much, much more. Focusing on result or activity English: Simple Past / Present Perfect / Past Perfect. I had lived in New York City before. Catherine… which is usually in the past simple. Functions of the past perfect continuous The past perfect continuous corresponds to the present perfect continuous, but with reference to a time earlier than 'before now'. Both past continuous and past perfect continuous tenses can be used to talk about actions or situations that were in progress at a certain point of time in the past. What are the differences between 'fast', 'quick' and 'quickly'? Had (not) + subject + been + present participle. Catherine    And me, Catherine. Can you work out which action or happened first? To make this verb form follow this pattern: subject + 'd/had/hadn't + been + present participle (-ing form). Menu. The past perfect continuous can help. CatherineWe'll explain when to use the past perfect simple instead of the past perfect continuous…. Past perfect continuousThe past perfect continuous is formed using 'had' + 'been' + verb-ing. The past perfect continuous (also called past perfect progressive) is a verb tense which is used to show that an action started in the past and continued up to another point in the past. We often use present perfect … (past perfect) How is it formed? NeilThat's right. Learn more. Neil… which we use to give background information to an event in the past. Sometimes, the action or situation that happens first in time comes second in the sentence. Oh, the present perfect! We can use it when we want to say how long this earlier action was happening for. John went to the doctor because he'd been having trouble sleeping. When should I use 'for' or 'to' to express purpose? Which is correct? What are the differences between 'peek', 'peak' and 'pique'? We use the present perfect simple (have/has + past participle) or present perfect continuous (have/has + been + -ing) to talk about a state or an activity that has a link to the present. 4. NeilGood, finally, number 3: a) Sam finally bought the car that he'd saved up for. CatherineAnd this time, both are correct. Like the past perfect simple, it talks about a past action that was in progress before another past action. NeilCorrect. The past perfect continuous can help. CatherineLet's start with an example. - Anne. The past perfect continuous tense (also called the past perfect progressive tense) is used to describe an action that began and was still in progress in the past before another past action started.In contrast to the past perfect tense, which describes a past action that finished before the second action started, the past perfect continuous emphasizes the continuous progress of that action. MultipleSelection_MTY2NDE= Past continuous and past simple. And the later action when they met was in the past simple. The earlier action was the walking, so that's in the past perfect continuous. (had + past participle) Why do we use this tense and not the simple past in this example? While the past continuous merely shows continuity, the past perfect continuous tense also puts an … The following sentence has the same meaning. It talks about actions in progress at a specific past time. ResultsThe past perfect continuous can show that the result of one action relates to another - like consequences. Here are those examples again, Finn. Past Perfect Continuous Quiz. Past continuous. Okay. Good job everyone! b) After they walked for three hours, they'd realised they were lost. We use both the present perfect simple (have or has + past participle) and the present perfect continuous (have or has + been + -ing form) to talk about past actions or states which are still connected to the present. Time to learn a useful tense for telling stories – the past perfect tense. Present perfect and past simple 2. The past perfect shows the earlier action and the past simple shows the later action. Find out more with Neil and Catherine in this episode of 6 Minute Grammar. CatherineBut if the earlier action had been completed, then we use the past perfect simple. Do you want to talk about past events that happened before other # past events? Related Pages See All. Remember, you can also subscribe to the podcast version. Once a time in the past has been set, it allows us to go back for a moment to a point before that. So, in that example the past perfect continuous was in a relative clause: which he had been hoping…. NeilThat's right. 2 years ago. Let's hear that example again. GapFillTyping_MTYzMTc= Level: intermediate. Read about our approach to external linking. NeilRight. What's the difference betwen the past continuous tense and past perfect continous tense? Past perfect continuous Do you want to talk about past events that happened before other past events? It doesn't matter in which order we say the two events. We use the past perfect continuous to describe an action or situation that was happening over a period of time up to another past event or point in time. Past perfect simple / continuous. Well, no, it’s quite logical, but it does have different uses. If you have a question about learners questions, you can email us on learning dot English at Bbc's UK and don't forget immediately. Do you want to talk about past events that happened before other past events? FinnJoe and Alice got together in 2012. Which action happened first? For a better experience please enable Javascript in your browser, Tim's Pronunciation Workshop (intermediate). Neil… and of course we'll finish with a quiz.

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